Anthony_Albanese

Labor Lock in New Leader

It’s decided. Anthony Albanese has taken over from Bill Shorten as the new leader of the Australian Labor Party, after nominations for the role closed on Monday morning. Victorian MP, Richard Marles, is expected to become his deputy.

New faces, new ideas for the party.

As expected, Albo, as he has been nicknamed, and his sidekick, were the only candidates to put their hands up for the role — and Albo says he’s honoured to do so.

Not only is he honoured, he’s confident he will bring the country under Labor leadership within the next three years.

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Albo reigns for top job

Thank you to members of caucus, rank and file members and affiliates for your support,’ the Sydney MP wrote on Facebook.

Together we can return our great party to government in three years [sic] time.

It comes as welcome news for the party, who consider the men to be the best fits for the job. Mr Marles said he, and Albo, promise to speak to voters that felt a shock after the results of last week’s election.

It’s really important that we understand what happened at the election. It’s important we make sure we’re talking to the widest range of people we can.

This is the first time the Labor party has been represented by two men since 2001, save for the three months in 2013 when Kevin Rudd ousted Julia Gillard.

But it’s not all breezy for the party here on out — Labor’s entire front bench will be facing a shake-up, AAP reports, following the loss.

Shorten implores voters to show faith

As he removes himself from the top job, Mr Shorten connected with his followers for the last time, following the ‘miracle’ election.

In an email released on Friday, he asked voters to believe in the two men replacing him.

Saturday night was a hard, raw moment for so many of us in the Labor family,’ he said.

But I say to all the true believers, all the branch members and union members and volunteers, we are a great movement and a resilient one.

The fight goes on — and Labor still needs you in the fight with us.

I urge you to keep the faith, to unite behind our new leadership, to carry on the battle and to know, in your hearts, that as long as Labor stands for the future, our time will come.

The first sitting of Parliament, expected to unfold before the end of June, will be a telling one.

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The Australian Tribune Editorial

The Australian Tribune Editorial

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  1. Why Labor thinks and acts that it is at war. Who is supposed to be the enemy? Why did Shorten and the leadership grand stand, telling reporters that they do not pay attention to the polls? On what other indicators did they think that they had it in the bag? On his own popularity, Mr Shorten kept dismissing the polls, but even the proverbial Fredie knows that he was hurting. Labor should reflect more on itself, rather then “go to the people”, trying to sell us the same … oil.
    The new leader has a good appeal. His talk is far more mature. He just does not come across that he would be capable in calling US presidential candidate, a “stark raving mad”. Imagine such person became our Prime minister, and US president flatly refuses to talk to him. Impossible? With Mr Trump, I doubt it.
    JL